Bride Dress and Groom Tuxedo Party Favor Boxes


dress, tuxedo, box, party

Please follow my new blog, Paper Zen, to see my new die cut patterns!

Damask Chair Party Favor Box


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Although I’m more of a tomboy than a girly-girl, I did save every wedding party favor as a little girl, dreaming of the day I would marry my sweetheart. I don’t know why I have such a thing for boxes, but I do love how it’s hiding a small surprise. The ones I love most serve double purpose, whether to be decorative or in this case, to show a guest to their seat.

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I used a heavyweight vellum which allows the damask pattern to be seen yet not obstruct the guest’s name. A square tag is glued to the front, with a couple’s special day and message.

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The 1.75″ cube has a chair backing that is 4.25″ tall. Two boxes can be cut from a single sheet of 11 x 8.5″ paper. In this example I’ve used Silver Stardream cardstock. The font used here is Great Vibes.

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Damask patterns have always been used in classic decor in such a broad range, and I struggled for quite some time to have the design be strong enough to hold the name tag. I also think it looks just as complete without the name tag, so it’s perfect for occasions other than weddings.

My Damask Chair Box is now available in my Etsy store for instant download. I’ve saved the files in SVG, DXF, MTC, and PDF formats. Thanks so much for your kind comments!

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Mysterious Stationery Box, All Things Paper


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Open, says me! I can finally open up and share more about my Mysterious Stationery Box, which was included in Ann Martin’s wonderful book, All Things Paper. Being the eagle-eyed blogger she is, Ann was able to call upon creatives all around the world who work with paper, and showcase just how versatile paper can be.

My project is based on a common Japanese box (Karakuri Bako), which is traditionally made of wood and fabric to hold jewelry in evenly divided compartments. The mystery behind it is how the lid is double-hinged, allowing it to reveal the main compartment (above), and the smaller side compartments (below).

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I make the lid stay closed snugly by gluing panels that just friction-fit within the compartment. I shot a video showing how it works that I hope Tuttle will show it soon on their site. This isn’t the first time making this box – actually I made it as my grad project while attending Emily Carr College so many years ago. I didn’t have money to buy the best materials back then, so when Ann asked me to create this project, I have to admit I was eager to re-do it with proper materials.

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Lineco Binder Board did exactly as advertised. Lineco’s board scared me at first because after applying glue to most of the surface, it did bow, but flattened itself out as it dried (I used to apply Lineco glue to matte board, then pile on phone books and wait overnight).
In the photo below I’m protecting the compartment with scrap paper while applying glue to a tab with a brush, another splurge since college and one that I was so pleased with because it allowed me to control the amount of glue better than spreading with a credit card. The Japanese patterned paper is made by hand and I was assured it will not tear even with repeated use because of its long fibers.

This project can be daunting for beginners, but I hope it inspires you to look at paper as a strong structural component to your creations.

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Another project in this book that caught my eye immediately was Allison Patrick’s Phone Book Letter Holder. I love how she’s given the diminished Yellow Pages a new life. Simple yet stylish, using materials around the house – my favorite combo.Want to win your own book? Simply visit Ann’s giveaway post!

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Paper Poinsettia and Wreath


Poinsettias simply say Christmas! The feedback I received for my fringed flowers was so overwhelming, I just had to make a Poinsettia version for Christmas cards.

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These paper blossoms are designed as a fringed flower to be quilled into shape. The stamen, petals, and leaves are designed as one strip of paper to allow for quick rolling / quilling. Color markers were used on white 28 lb paper in these examples, however they can be cut from colored paper and the three parts glued into one strip.

The pine needle wreath is cut from two pieces of 80 lb paper and overlapped, then fluffed into shape to give the poinsettias a festive base. This example is a 5″ x 7″ card.

A regular envelope wouldn’t do, so I made a windowed box to protect the blossoms.

Maybe I was a squirrel in a previous life, but as a little girl I loved boxes to hold things, keep secrets in them, and to give gifts in. This cube has a prepared hole for an enlarged version of the poinsettia. The cube is 2.5″ x 2.5″ x 2.5″.

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I don’t bake a lot of cupcakes so this is about as close as I’d come to cupcake toppers. I have loved ones who are allergic to nuts and some who can’t handle spicy foods. Instead of a quilling tool, I rolled the poinsettia in a toothpick, then glued in place. Added the warning flag at the bottom, and voila – food markers.

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If you’d like to cut and quill paper poinsettias this Christmas, this Poinsettia Collection can be downloaded immediately via my store. I’d love to see what you make with my files, so drop me a line!

Paint a White Christmas


Need snow? Paint yourself a winter wonderland. Daiso sells pearlescent white paint for $2 in a small tube. Use a fine brush, load it up, and let the paint scrape against the edges of your craft project (in this case a party favor box).

Try to make it look like natural snow drift by painting from one direction (so don’t coat every edge).

This triangular party favor box is sold on Etsy, along with other dinner party paper decor. Half-moon shaped flaps are on both ends to allow easy access to your stocking stuffer. Perfectly size for biscotti treats.

Tricked your Treat



Who won the “What’s inside the coffin contest?” No body. The answer is fish skeleton! Make no bones about it – I even put the answer in my listing! Please, no booing! Thank you all for playing! I had a screech 🙂 Check out the entire listing on my Etsy store.

One more if you dare? Why couldn’t Dracula’s wife get to sleep? Because of his coffin.

Crouching Spider, Hidden Candy


OK so it wasn’t hard to guess what was coming, but I hope you’ve enjoyed the unveiling of my die cut Halloween coffin boxes.

 

This one has a spider web made of black vinyl hidden on the inside of the coffin’s lid. A small length of fishing wire is attached to the spider so kids will get an extra hidden surprise as they reach for the goodies inside. I have always loved shiny black on matte, a subtle and entrancing effect.

 

Here are some of my prototypes. Can anyone guess what’s inside? I’ll give you a hint – it’s white and emaciated. Please be very specific – only fully correct guesses will qualify.

I will email a free SVG or DXF spider file to anyone who guesses correctly by next Monday, Oct 10, 2011.

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